Presentation Title

It takes a proverb to raise a Burundian child: proverbs as a primary child rearing tool for instilling vital individual and social values.

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Mentor/Supervising Professor Name

N/A

Description

It takes a proverb to raise a Burundian child: proverbs as a primary child rearing tool for instilling vital individual and social values.

The obvious echoing of the popular African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” is intended to underscore the fundamental place of this universal “literary genre”. In recent years, proverbs scholarship has gained momentum, however, all regions have not received equal attention. Such is the case of the Great Lakes region of Africa.

This presentation is a quick sharing of an on-going research that intends to analyze the relevance and centrality of Burundian proverbs as they relate to child rearing. Burundians firmly believe that a child is the primary recipient of most enunciations of proverbs through which cultural ethos and social values are tactfully transmitted. Specific stylistic devices foster memory retention and make their textuality fascinating. Potentially, they could help to chart a culturally sensitive Christian philosophy of education in Burundi.

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Apr 21st, 3:30 PM Apr 21st, 4:45 PM

It takes a proverb to raise a Burundian child: proverbs as a primary child rearing tool for instilling vital individual and social values.

It takes a proverb to raise a Burundian child: proverbs as a primary child rearing tool for instilling vital individual and social values.

The obvious echoing of the popular African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” is intended to underscore the fundamental place of this universal “literary genre”. In recent years, proverbs scholarship has gained momentum, however, all regions have not received equal attention. Such is the case of the Great Lakes region of Africa.

This presentation is a quick sharing of an on-going research that intends to analyze the relevance and centrality of Burundian proverbs as they relate to child rearing. Burundians firmly believe that a child is the primary recipient of most enunciations of proverbs through which cultural ethos and social values are tactfully transmitted. Specific stylistic devices foster memory retention and make their textuality fascinating. Potentially, they could help to chart a culturally sensitive Christian philosophy of education in Burundi.